Today:

I am a recovering compulsive overeater, abstinent by the grace of God one more day at a time.  For details, check out my food journal.  Today, I went to a couple meetings I desperately needed to attend.  At one of them, I heard so many of the things I needed to hear, it left me wishing I could have recorded it to play over and over.  I was uplifted as I left, but spun into self-centered fumes even before my wheels hit my driveway.  It is amazing to me how quickly the flesh raises up against the spiritual progress we make!

 

From today’s entry in Voices of Recovery:

“Indecision is like the stepchild; if he doesn’t wash his hands, he is called ‘dirty,’ if he does, he is wasting the water.” — Madagascan proverb as quoted in For Today, p. 247

 

Indecision…  What can I say about indecision?  I’ll have to think about it.

 

Just kidding!  The truth is that indecision is evidence that we have not firmed up our priorities for the occasion.  In food terms, if I can’t decide what to eat, I haven’t made my Plan of Eating a priority.  Sure, flexibility is necessary considering procurement and measurement of our food choices, but the more likely scenario has us indecisive about whether to or not to do what we know to do rather than what we feel like.  I cannot wait until the time for action comes to decide how to act.  I have to decide beforehand in order to act now.  This is how one navigates through the checkout aisle without succumbing to the well-planned strategies of the candy marketers – pre-planning.

 

Regarding spiritual alignment it is no different.  Temptations exist to distract us from remaining in connection with our Higher Power.  In order to resist them, we must make our decision prior to encountering them.  This is the reason the A.A. founders put Step Three before Step Nine.  A decision must precede action, or we won’t know what action to take.  A bachelor might face indecision about buying a sports car or a speedboat, but a family man doesn’t have the same dilemma because the priorities to which he is committed make certain decisions for him.  He may drive a less appealing family car out of necessity, but he carries inside himself a joy the bachelor has yet to understand.

 

A commitment to health, love, and service turns options into opportunities.  Because I love my Creator, I choose love, seek wisdom, and live abundantly.  Anything that distracts me from that isn’t really an option; it’s an obstacle!

 

Yesterday, Brian Davis posted in the All Pro Dad blog an article on the subject of preparing to resist temptation called “Greek Mythology and Your Battle Against Lust.”  I thought it was very appropriate for compulsive eaters and addicts, though it was addressed at the problem of sexual temptation.

 

From Proverbs 19:

20 Listen to advice and accept instruction,
and in the end you will be wise.”

Before admitting I was powerless, I was well armed against advice and instruction.  Pride and egoism hardened me against receiving anything that was not said or experienced directly by me.  I was committed to living my life my way.  “It’s a free country!  I can do anything I want!” was the motto of my juvenile thinking.  Today, I let my powerlessness work for me.  It is the key that unlocks willingness to be filled with the advice and instruction offered by my Manufacturer.  The emptiness that once shamed me now makes me a useful vessel.  Like a clean pitcher, I can now be employed for the purpose and by the power of the Creator, as long as I remain submitted to His will and attentive to His direction.

 

That sounds familiar: Choose love, seek wisdom, and live abundantly!

 

From my reading through the Bible, currently in Psalm 96 and 97:

96:1 Sing to the Lord a new song;
sing to the Lord, all the earth.”

 

Even before reading Psalm 96 today, I was recently thinking that, although many who do not feel they are good at it believe singing is optional, just as many or more believe that spiritual health is insignificant.  We in recovery know better, and seek a spiritual solution for the three fold, physical – emotional – spiritual, disorder that has plagued our lives. The word “spirit” comes from a combination of words that mean “animating breath” (spīri – tus).  Singing is the Scripture-recommended expression of that motivating wind inside us.  It is a means to exercise our spiritual health and simultaneously connect with the Great Spirit who breathes Life into us.  As instruments of praise, we do what we are when we submit to making a joyful noise to God.  Resistance has ego at the helm steering our priorities through an imaginary course of obstacle-illusions like perfectionism, pride, comparison to others, and measuring our own ability rather than trusting God’s.  According to Verse 5, “all the gods of the nations are idols,” and that includes self-pride.  Verse 12 points out that the trees sing out to Him.  Can you imagine a tree trying with all its might to keep its leaves from whistling as the wind blows through them?  How futile!  How ridiculous!  I can almost hear the self-centered tower of timber object, “Trees are for bearing fruit, giving shade, and one day providing building material; it is not for me to warble like one of these flitting birds!”   What defect is obstructing your wind-instrument?  Is it worth maintaining just to be the stubborn tree?

 

For those like me, who like to have a reason, the answer to the question “why?” is in Psalm 97:9, “ For you, O Lord, are the Most High over all the earth; you are exalted far above all gods.”  There is also the scientific proof of the benefits of rhythmic breathing, positive affirmation, self-hypnosis, internal resonance, meditation, and the list goes on.

 

From The “Big Book” of Alcoholics Anonymous, “There is a solution” page 27:

“Here and there, once in a while, alcoholics have had what are called vital spiritual experiences. To me these occurrences are phenomena. They appear to be in the nature of huge emotional displacements and rearrangements. Ideas, emotions, and attitudes which were once the guiding forces of the lives of these men are suddenly cast to one side, and a completely new set of conceptions and motives begin to dominate them.”

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